Special Education Department

 

                         SPECIAL EDUCATION DEPARTMENT

 

901   ENGLISH  1  1 CREDIT

 Suggested Grade Level: 9

 English I continues to develop student’s language arts abilities in reading, writing, speaking, and thinking gained in the elementary and middle school.  Students study a variety of types of literature and practice the stages of the writing process by composing for a variety of purposes and audiences.  They refine their abilities to handle conventional matters of punctuation, spelling, and usage within the context of writing.  Students’ writing experiences are not restricted to responding to and interpreting literature.

 Students Expectations and Experiences:

   1. Review grammar rules and principles

  2. Apply grammar principles to usage skills

  3. Apply usage skills in writing

  4. Increase vocabulary skills

  5. Apply listening skills

  6. Learn organization and outline skills

  7. Apply organization and outline skills to prewriting

  8. Learn how to write a good paragraph with topic sentence, development, and clincher

  9. Apply mechanics skills to writings

10. Recognize the elements of the short story

11. Develop reading comprehension

12. Develop skills in interpreting literature

13. Develop an understanding of the literary genres

14. Begin preparation of writings: at least one personal narrative, and one short story, or one poem

15. Utilize technology in writing

 

 

902   ENGLISH 2   1 CREDIT

 Suggested Grade Level: 10

English II continues the refinement of student’s skills in language arts.  Students read, respond to, and interpret a variety of types of literature and journalistic writings and continue their study of the writing process, reinforcing their writing skills in addressing a variety of audiences and purposes.  Student writing in context is used as the basis for teaching the skills of mechanics and usage.

Student Expectations and Experiences:

   1. Review grammar rules and principles

  2. Apply grammar principles to usage skills

  3. Apply usage skills in writing and speaking

  4.  Increase vocabulary skills

  5. Apply listening skills

  6. Learn organizational skills and outline skills

  7. Learn note taking skills

  8. Learn to relate organizational skills to writing skills

  9. Apply knowledge of writing formats to actual writings

10. Continue to develop understanding of the elements of literature as contained in the different genres

11. Increase reading comprehension skills and interpreting literature skills

12. Develop writing techniques through revision

13. Continue preparation of portfolio writings: at least one personal narrative, and one short story, or one poem

14. Utilize technology in writing


 

 903   ENGLISH 3    1 CREDIT

 Suggested Grade Level: 11

 English III continues to develop students’ competencies in language arts skills.  Content includes instruction in oral and written composition; study skills and references and research techniques; and the historical, cultural, and aesthetic significance of American Literature.  Continuing to practice the steps in the writing process, students write for a variety of purposes (e.g., self, academic).  As in English I and II, mechanics and usage are taught within the context of students’ compositions.

 Student Expectations and Experiences:

   1. Review grammar rules and principles

  2. Apply grammar principles to usage skills

  3. Apply usage skills in writing and speaking

  4. Increase vocabulary skills

  5. Apply listening skills

  6. Develop writing skills in various writing modes

  7. Apply mechanics and usage skills in revising written work

  8. Develop appreciation of American literature

  9. Comprehend the relationship among history, society, and literature

10. Develop skills interpreting literature

11. Increase reading comprehension skills

12. Demonstrate independent project and group work abilities

13. Express oneself through oral presentation

14. Continue development of portfolio writings: at least one personal narrative, and one short story, or one poem

15. Utilize technology

 

904   ENGLISH 4     1 CREDIT

 Suggested Grade Level: 12

 English IV offers continued refinement of students’ abilities in language arts skills.  Content includes appropriate experience in oral and written composition and the historical, cultural, and aesthetic value of English and/or world literature.  Continuing to write for a variety of purposes (e.g., to express thought and feeling, to persuade) and audiences (e.g., self and others), should attain confidence in handling the stages of the writing process.  Special attention to writing about literature is given in the pre-college curriculum.  Language and mechanics concerns are dealt with in the context of student writing.

 Student Expectations and Experiences:

   1. Review grammar rules and principles

  2. Apply grammar principles to usage skills

  3. Apply usage skills in writing and speaking

  4. Increase vocabulary

  5. Apply listening skills

  6. Recognize errors in writing and correct writing

  7. Work on revision techniques through language and style

  8. Develop writing skills in various writing modes

  9. Develop appreciation of English literature

10. Comprehend the relationship among history, society, and literature

11. Develop skills in interpreting literature

12. Demonstrate independent project and group work

13. Express oneself through oral presentation

14. Utilize technology

15. Prepare final portfolio entries, plus write at least one personal narrative, and one short story, or one poem


 

 905   PREPARATORY ALGEBRA   1 CREDIT

 Grade Level: 9

 Prerequisite:  Required of all freshman except those that have taken Algebra I in the eighth grade.

 Student Expectations and Experience

 1. Select, apply, and justify appropriate mathematical procedures to solve real-life problems using real numbers.

2. Mathematical definition and generalization and utilizing technology.

3. Justify and communicate answers and solution processes.

4. Determine reasonableness of results by estimation.

5. Communicate, model, and apply multiple representations of real numbers.

6. Solve and graph one and two variable equations and inequalities.

 

 

906   ALGEBRA I   1 CREDIT

 Grade Level: 9-12

 Prerequisite:  High School preparatory Algebra with a grade of A or B, or Algebra I in eighth grade, but have not received credit.

 Student Expectation and Experience

 1. Demonstrate an understanding of number theory and the application in problem solving

2. Write and solve linear equations and inequalities and their applications

3. Solve no-linear functions such as quadratic, exponential and absolute value equations and their application

4. Collect, organize, and display two variable data

5. Use proportional reasoning to write and solve real world problems

6. See patterns in arithmetic, geometric, quadratic, cubic sequences and relate to equations

7. Use combinations, permutations, and probability experiments and interpret the results

 

 

907   GEOMETRY  1 CREDIT

 Grade Level: 10-12

 Prerequisite: Algebra I  (2710)

 This course is designed for college bound students who had difficulty mastering the concepts in Algebra I or do not intend to pursue post-secondary mathematics or science programs.  Fundamentals are thoroughly introduced so that students develop basic geometric concepts and learn to apply geometric principles.  manipulative such as geoboards, three-dimensional models, and tools for paper-folding should be incorporated in the course.   Topics will include points, lines, planes, plane figures, area and perimeter of plane figures, congruence, similarity, ratio and proportion, volume and surface area of solids, constructions and congruence, and measurements.  This course meets our state guidelines for pre-college curriculum requirements.

 Student Expectations and Experiences

 1. Deduce properties of, and relationships between figures from given assumptions

2. Classify figures (angles) in terms of congruence, similarity and apply these relationships

3. Classify figures (triangles) in terms f congruencies, similarities and apply these relationships

4. Represent problem situations (polygon relationships) with geometric models and apply properties of figures

5. Use of formulas to determine area, perimeter, and volumes of two and three dimensional figures

6. Represent problem situations with geometric models and apply properties of figures

 

  

919   CONSUMER MATH

 Grade Level:  11-12

 Pre-requisite: Algebra I & Geometry

 Student Expectations and Experience

  1. Demonstrate basic math skills
  2. Demonstrate the ability to manage money through gross income, net income, recording keeping, checking accounts, and savings accounts.
  3. Demonstrate the ability to manage expenses through cash purchases, charge accounts and credit cards, and loans.
  4. Analyze how to make financial decisions regarding vehicle transportation, housing costs, insurance and investments.
  5. Understand how to make business decisions regarding personnel, purchasing and inventory, sales and marketing.
  6. Understand how to manage business finances.

 

921_ALGEBRA II

 Grade Level: 10-12

 Prerequisite:  Any student that makes a C or D in Algebra I (107) - Must take this Algebra II course. 

 This course is designed for college bound students.  In addition to expanding the mathematical concepts of Algebra I, emphasis should be placed on preparation of study of higher mathematics/abstract thinking skills, the function concept, and the algebraic solution of problems in various content areas.  Topics include the complex number system and matrices, quadratic equations and inequalities, graphs of functions and relations, and introductory work in conic sections.  This course meets our state guidelines for pre-college curriculum requirements.

 Student Expectations and Experience

 1. Demonstrate an understanding of number theory concepts and their applications

2. Perform operations on algebraic expressions, solve equalities, and inequalities

3. Simplify rational algebraic expressions

4. Explore nonlinear data and use of graphs to display data in an appropriate manner

5. Simplify radicals, rational number exponents, radical equations

6. Understand and use complex numbers

7. Demonstrate an understanding of coordinate geometry

 

  

918  CHEMISTRY IN THE COMMUNITY  1 CREDIT

 Prerequisite: Biology, Integrated Science and Pre-Algebra

 Grade: 10-12

 Students will:

  • Identify and refine questions and identify scientific concepts to guide the design of scientific investigations.
  • Design and conduct different kinds of scientific investigations for a wide variety of reasons.
  • Use equipment (e.g., microscopes, lasers), tools (e.g., beakers), techniques (e.g., computers), mathematics to improve scientific investigations and communications.
  • Use evidence, logic, and scientific knowledge to develop and revise scientific explanations and models.
  • Communicate designs, procedures, and results of scientific investigations.
  • Review and analyze scientific investigations and explanations of others.
  • Analyze atomic structure and electric forces.
  • Examine nuclear structure, nuclear forces, and nuclear reactions (e.g., fission, fusion, radioactivity).
  • Investigate how the structure of matter (e.g., outer electrons, type of bond) relates to chemical properties of matter.
  • Investigate how the structure of matter (e.g., constituent atoms, distances and angles between atoms) relates to physical properties of matter.
  • Investigate chemical reactions and the release or consumption of energy.
  • Examine the transfer of electrons or hydrogen ions between reacting ions, molecules, or atoms.
  • Investigate factors (e.g., temperature, catalysts) affecting reaction rates.
  • Investigate forces and the effects of forces on the motion of objects.
  • Investigate gravitational and electromagnetic forces.
  • Examine how energy is transferred (e.g., collisions, light waves) and recognize that the total energy of the universe is constant.
  • Distinguish between types of energy (e.g., kinetic energy, potential energy, energy fields).
  • Examine how everything tends to become less organized and less orderly over time (e.g., heat moves from hotter to cooler objects).
  • Investigate energy transfer caused when waves and matter interact (e.g., atoms and molecules can absorb and emit light waves).
  • Recognize that the Earth contains a fixed amount of each stable chemical atom or element.
  • Apply scientific inquiry and conceptual understandings to solving problems of technological  design (e.g., Styrofoam cups, transistors, computer chips).
  • Examine the interaction between science and technology.
  • Explore the impact of scientific knowledge and discoveries on personal and community health.
  • Recognize how science influences human population growth.
  • Use science to investigate natural hazards and human-induced hazards.
  • Analyze how science and technology are necessary but not sufficient for solving local, national, and global issues.
  • Analyze the role science plays in everyday life and compare different careers in science.
  • Recognize that scientific knowledge comes from empirical standards, logical arguments, skepticism, and is subject to change as new evidence becomes available.
  • Investigate advances in science and technology that have important and long-lasting effects on science and society (e.g., Newtonian mechanics, plate tectonics, germ theory, medical and health technology).          

 

 

911   POLITICAL SCIENCE  1 CREDIT

 This course examines the basic structures of governments and institutions. The relationship of power and decision-making are examined through the study of the Constitution of the United States and the amendments, other historical documents, the State Constitution and local governing bodies.  Democratic values and citizen participation are stressed throughout the course.  Student participation in the community should be encouraged.

 Student Expectations and Experiences

1. Students will be able to describe the foundations of our government from the Articles of the Confederation to the Constitution.

2. Students will be able to explain and discuss the duties and responsibilities of a good citizen.

3. Students will be able to compare how our three branches of government work and the relationships between the branches.

4. Students will be able to interpret the role of the state government in their lives.

5. Students will be able to describe how local governments serve their citizens

6. Students will be able to discuss our election process and be able to apply it to our society.

7. Students will be able to describe and assess our court system and the rights provided by the system.

8. Students will be able to interpret the Bill of Rights and freedoms protected by these and other Amendments.

 

912  UNITED STATES HISTORY   1 CREDIT

 The United States history course should serve as a capstone to the study of America’s history in grades 5-8.  After brief review, the focus should be on the Reconstruction period to the present, looking at the forces that shaped and continue to shape political, economic, and social institutions and the impact of those forces on the development of the United States in the twentieth century.  The course may be taught chronologically, topically, and/or conceptually/thematically.

 Student Expectations and Experiences

 1. Students will be able to analyze the cause of the Civil War and the results through reconstruction.

2. Students will be able to describe and evaluate the effects of the Industrial Revolution had on our country and the world.

3. Students will be able to describe the effects of the Progressive Movement had on our government system in the early 1900’s.

4. Students will be able to analyze the cause and effect relationship between WWI and WWII.

5. Students will be able to demonstrate a knowledge of the FDR years and his role in the Great Depression and WWII.

6. Students will be able to analyze the effects of the 1960’s, including the Civil Rights Movement and the Vietnam  War.

7. Students will be able to describe the expansion westward and how it helped the development of our country.