Social Studies Department

SOCIAL STUDIES

DEPARTMENT

 

301   POLITICAL SCIENCE    1 CREDIT

This course examines the development of government and specifically the development of American Federalism.  Students will examine how government and laws came to be as well as the history and development of the American system of government.  During this examination, students will develop an understanding of American political institutions at the Federal, State and Local level.  Students will also examine how laws, public policy, and foreign policy are developed through the interaction of the branches. Students will examine the liberties they have and how the actions of government and other individuals affect their individual liberties.   Democratic values and citizen participation are stressed throughout the course.  Student participation in the community is encouraged.

Student Expectations and Experiences

1. Students will be able to describe the foundations of our government from the Articles of the Confederation to the Constitution.

2. Students will be able to explain and discuss the duties and responsibilities of a good citizen.

3. Students will be able to compare how our three branches of government work and the relationships between the branches.

4. Students will be able to interpret the role of the state government in their lives.

5. Students will be able to describe how local governments serve their citizens.

6. Students will be able to discuss our election process and be able to apply it to our society.

7. Students will be able to describe and assess our court system and the rights provided by the system.

8. Students will be able to interpret the Bill of Rights and freedoms protected by these and other Amendments.

 

 

 

302   UNITED STATES HISTORY      1  CREDIT                To be taken in the student’s Junior year at McLean County

The United States History course should serve as a capstone to the study of America's history in grades 5-8.  After brief review, the focus should be on the Reconstruction period to the present, looking at the forces that shaped and continue to shape political, economic, and social institutions and the impact of those forces on the development of the United States in the twentieth century.  The course may be taught chronologically, topically, and/or conceptually/thematically.

Student Expectations and Experiences

1.  Students will be able to analyze the cause of the Civil War and the results through reconstruction.

2.  Students will be able to describe as evaluate the effects of the Industrial Revolution had on our country and the world.

3.  Students will be able to describe the expansion westward and how it helped the development of our country.

4.  Students will be able to describe the effects of the Progressive Movement had on our government system in the early 1900’s.

5.  Students will be able to analyze the cause and effect relationship between WWI and WWII.

6.  Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the FDR years and his role in the Great Depression and WWI.

7.  Students will be able to analyze the effects of the 1960’s, including the Civil Rights Movement and the Vietnam War.

8.  Students will be able to analyze the impact of the Cold War on the United States and how its status as the only Super Power after that period has impacted our relations to the world.

 

 

 

303   WORLD CIVILIZATION      1  CREDIT

This course is intended for those looking to go to college and satisfies most college’s entrance requirements.  Sophomores (10) looking to take World Civilization must have attained a 75 or better in Political Science in order to take this course during their tenth grade year.

The World History course should extend student's knowledge of the world gained in grades 6 and 7, reviewing civilizations before 1500 but focusing mainly on the world since 1500.  Students need to comprehend the contemporary world, based on an understanding and appreciation of the past.  The course should embrace a truly global view of the history of humankind.  Recognition of the contributions of Western Civilization is important, but a complete world view necessarily includes adequate treatment of civilizations of Africa, Asia, and Latin America.  The course should be interdisciplinary, drawing on concepts from social studies disciplines, including history, anthropology, economics, geography, political science, psychology, and sociology, as well as utilizing the arts, literature, and philosophy

Student Expectations and Experiences

1. Students will demonstrate an adequate knowledge of world history in the following areas:  Medieval European Civilization,  Renaissance through Scientific Revolution European Civilization, Asian Civilizations, Islamic Civilization, 20th Century  Western Civilization, and the Third World.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                

2. Students will identify world locations and develop geography and map skills.

3. Students will develop proficiency in writing and their critical analysis of important historical issues and topics.

4. Students will demonstrate improved group cooperation and presentation skills through participation in group projects.

5. Students will read and analyze at least one literary work connected with important historical topics.

6. Students will demonstrate a proficiency in all areas appropriate to college preparation.

 

 

310  ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP EUROPEAN HISTORY)        1 CREDIT

Grade Level 11-12

Prerequisite:  Must have the course instructor of Social Studies Department chair approval before being accepted into this course.

AP European History is an elective course suggested for students who are academically proficient and highly motivated.  This course demands that students maintain a collegiate level of achievement.  Admission to this course is limited to students in their 11th and 12th grade years.  Also students must have the approval of the course’s instructor or the Social Studies Department chairperson before being accepted into the course.  The course is designed to provide students with the analytic skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and materials in studying European History, from the late medieval period to the “present”.  AP European History emphasizes the major intellectual, cultural, political, diplomatic, social, and economic themes in modern European History.  Students who successfully complete this course will be expected to take a standardized comprehensive exam.  Any student who passes this exam will be awarded collegiate credit hours by most colleges and universities.

Student Expectations and Experiences

  1. Students will demonstrate an extensive knowledge of the European,  social, political, and cultural history in the period from High Middle Ages to the present.
  2. Students will be proficient in the critical analysis of historical issues and topics.
  3. Students will be proficient in the critical use of historical documents.
  4. Students will read and analyze various  literary works connected with important historical issues.
  5. Students will demonstrate a proficiency in all areas equal to that of a college freshman
  6. STUDENTS MUST TAKE THE COLLEGE BOARD AP EXAMINATION.

 

312  ADVANCE PLACEMENT (AP) AMERICAN HISTORY     1 HIGH SCHOOL CREDIT    

Grade Level:  11-12

Prerequisite:  Must have the course instructor or Social Studies Department chair approval before being accepted into this course.

This course is an elective course recommended for students in the 11th and 12th grades who are academically proficient and highly motivated.  The course demands that students maintain a collegiate level in writing, analysis and comprehension.  The course emphasizes critical evaluation skills and factual knowledge related to U.S. History from discover to the present. 

Students who decide to take this course will be required to take the Advance Placement test in this area at the end of the year.  Successful completion of the test can earn students college credit at colleges and universities.

Student Expectations and Experiences

  1. Students will demonstrate an extensive knowledge of the United States social, political, and cultural history in the period from discovery to the present.
  2. Students will exhibit proficiency in critical analysis of historical issues.
  3. Students will exhibit proficiency in the critical use of primary and secondary historical documents.
  4. Students will ready and analyze literature related to the issues discussed.

 

 

  SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIAL STUDIES         1 CREDIT/ CLASS

These will only be offered once all required courses have been filled and there are teachers available to teach.

These topics will go further in depth in specific areas of social studies than the required courses that are offered.  Each topic will be specific to that teacher and will analyze an area of social studies that usually is neglected or is of specific interest.  The following course will be available:

304            – Pop Culture:             - 1950’s to the Present – This class will look at the music, art, and culture of this time period.

 

308  GEOGRAPHY    1 CREDIT

The study of geography involves both physical and human geography.  Physical geography is the descriptive science dealing with the surface of the earth including continents and countries, the climate, plants, animals and natural resources of the various earth divisions.  Human geography is a discipline in which the concepts, generalizations and facts derived from both the social and physical sciences converge in the study of specific places, the peoples who inhabit them, and why people would settle on or move from/to a location.  Human geography also examines the impact of the physical world on the cultures and habits of different groups.

Student Expectations and Experiences:

  1. Students will be able to identify and analyze different physical features and how they impact each other.
  2. Students will develop the ability to use maps to determine location and analyze why different groups of people have settled where they are.
  3. Students will be able to describe and analyze different cultures and peoples from around the world.
  4. Students will be able to analyze how physical features have impacted different groups of people.
  5. Students will be able to compare and contrast their culture with those of others from around the world.

 

309  PSYCHOLOGY     1 Credit

Psychology is an elective class that will allow students an introduction into the workings of the human mind and the study of human behavior.  It is highly recommended for students in 11th and 12th grades who may have an interest in psychology in college.  Students will be required to not only understand the biological makeup of the brain, but also contemplate the reasons for human behavior according to brain development, social settings, and other environmental factors.

Units of  Study

  1. Intro to psychology
  2. Research techniques
  3. Developmental Psychology
  4. The Body and Behavior
  5. Altered States of Consciousness
  6. Sensation and Perception
  7. Learning and Conditioning
  8. Addiction
  9. Psychological Disorders
  10. Social Psychology