Science Department

SCIENCE

DEPARTMENT

 

201  AP ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE   1 CREDIT

Prerequisite: Biology                       Required Co-requisite 222 AP Environmental Lab

The goal of this course is to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, and to evaluate the risks associated with these problems and examine alternative solutions for resolving and/or preventing them.

This class is meant to be taken along with AP Environmental Science Lab class.  If you take this course, you should also be signed up for AP Environmental Science Lab as well.  Because these classes go together, if you wish to drop this class or AP Environmental Science Lab, you must do it within the first 2 weeks of the Fall semester.  You may not drop either class after the two week grace period.

Academic Expectations: 2.1-2.6 (Scientific Method, Patterns, Systems, Scales and Models, Constancy and Change over Time)

Core Content Addressed

  1. Explain the relationships and connections between matter, energy, living systems, and the physical environment
  2. Give examples of conservation of matter and energy
  3. Describe components and reservoirs involved in biogeochemical cycles
  4. Explain the movement of matter and energy In biogeochemical cycles
  5. Explain real world applications of energy using information/data
  6. Evaluate explanations of mechanical systems using current scientific knowledge about energy
  7. Describe the connections between the functioning of Earth systems and its sources of energy.
  8. Predict consequences of changes to any component of the Earth system
  9. Explain the cause and effect relationship between global climate and weather patterns and energy transfer
  10. Evaluate proposed solutions from multiple perspectives to environmental problems caused by human interactions
  11. Justify positions using evidence/data.
  12. Predict the consequences of changes to any component of the Earth’s atmosphere.
  13. Select or defend solutions to real-world problems of population control.
  14. Human activities can deliberately or inadvertently alter the dynamics in ecosystems.

 

202   BIOLOGY        1 CREDIT

Grade Level:  10

Biology I is the study of life and its interaction with our environment.  Studies cover the structure and function of microscopic to multicellular organisms.  Biological facts are addressed, biological terminology and theories relating to the life sciences are covered throughout the course.  General topics covered include the cell, genetics, microbiology, invertebrates and ecology.  Some chapters are supplemented with laboratory work.  There will be a number of dissections.

Academics Expectations:  2.1 - 2.6 (Scientific Method, Patterns, Systems, Scale and Models, Constancy and Change Over Time)

Core Content Addressed:

  1.  State, define and use the steps of the scientific method

  2.  Develop an understanding of the seven characteristics of living things

  3.  Introduce the concept of inorganic and organic compounds in living things

  4.  Differentiate between prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells and describe the structure and function of a cell

  5.  Define, compare and contrast the functions of photosynthesis and cellular respiration

  6.  Explain DNA structure and replication as well as protein synthesis

  7.  Describe the steps of mitosis and the significance and outcomes of each event

  8.  Introduces genetic principles including using the punnent square and applying these principles to living things

  9.  Introduce the mechanisms of gene expression in both normal and abnormal development

10.  Develop an understanding of hereditary characteristics

11.  Become familiar with taxonomy within the five kingdom system of classification

12.  State distinguishing characteristics between the Monera, Protista, Fungi, Plantae and Animal kingdoms

13.  Differentiate viruses from cellular organisms 

14.  Differentiate vertebrate from invertebrate organisms

15.  Comparison study of the different phylum within the Animal kingdom

16.  Describe the origin, phylogeny, development and morphology of living organisms

17.  Define the ecological units of the biosphere

18.  Describe the various roles of individual organisms and energy flow through ecosystems

19.  Differentiate biotic from abiotic.

 

203   CHEMISTRY       1 CREDIT

Prerequisite:  ICP or Integrated Science, Biology, Algebra I

Grade Level:  10 - 12

Chemistry I offer students activities and lab experiments in the study of the composition of substances and their effects upon one another.  It will satisfy the minimum requirement for admission into college.  Admission to this class is based on students past performance in math and science classes, teacher recommendation, ACT Explore and/or ACT Plan science benchmark scores.

Student Expectation and Experience

  1.  Work with significant digits and SI units to solve mathematical problems

  2.  Classify matter in terms of atoms, molecules, compounds, mixtures, and solution

  3.  Use lab skills to determine and confirm scientific answers

  4.  Complete and balance a variety of equations given only the reactants

  5.  Describe the atomic theory and the various models of the atom from a historical context

  6.  Utilize the periodic table of elements to predict properties and characteristics of elements

  7.  Determine percent composition of a compound

  8.  Solve for the empirical formula of a compound

  9.  Use stoichiometry to determine the masses required for reactions to occur or the masses produced by given amounts of reactant

10.  Comprehend the standard gas laws and use the properly to solve problems

11.  Work with solution concentration of an unknown base using titration

12.  Use oxidation numbers

13.  Utilize proper nomenclature in all aspects of inorganic and elementary organic chemistry

14.  Describe the basic processes involved in nuclear chemistry

15.  Analyze how chemistry affects daily life and be aware of its importance in terms of environmental problems and solutions

16.  Analyze the conversion of potential energy to kinetic energy

Chemistry vs. Chem Com

       Teacher Recommendation

       C or better in Science classes

       C or better in Math classes

       Students in RTI math will be allowed in Chemistry cautiously, but would be recommended to take Chem Com.

 

 

204   ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY      1  CREDIT

Prerequisite:  Biology , Integrated Science or ICP, and Chemistry

Grade Level:  11 or 12.

Anatomy is the study of the structure and vital function of the human body.  Lectures will place an emphasis on an understanding physiology (how the body works) from cellular level of organization to an organ level of organization of the each body system.  Detailed dissections, current event, research topics, and lab Studies will compose a significant portion of the last nine weeks.

Academic Expectations:  2.1 - 2.6 (Scientific Method, Patterns, Systems, Scales and Models, Constancy and Change Over Time)

Core Content Addressed:

  1.  Examination of homeostasis

  2.  Anatomical terminology

  3.  Examination of the inorganic and organic compounds utilized within the human body

  4.  Discussion of the chemical reactions occurring the human body and where they are utilized

  5.  Cellular level of organization

  6.  Introduction of the tissue levels and where they occur in the body

  7.  Identify by name, origin, function and location of the bones of the human skeleton

  8.  Identify by name, origin, function and location of the major muscles of the human body

  9.  List and describe the components of the human circulatory system and the function and structure of each component

10.  Describe the components of the blood

11.  Name and describe the respiratory organs and identify their structure and function

12.  Locate and explain the functions of the various organs of the digestive system

13.  List the organs involved in waste elimination

14.  Study and examine the male and female reproductive systems

15.  Describe the processes of gametogenesis and fertilization

16.  List, describe and locate the endocrine glands of the endocrine system

17.  Describe the functions of the nervous system by structure and function

18.  Identify the parts of the nervous system by structure and function

19.  Discuss symptoms of common disorders of each human body system discussed

20.  Examination of bacteria cultures

 

 

205   ANIMAL BIOLOGY AND DIVERSITY (ZOOLOGY)  ½ CREDIT

Grade Level: 10 – 12

Elective

This course is designed to give students an understanding of animal phyla and major classes with emphasis upon morphological adaptations and biological systems that have evolved to maintain organismal and population homeostasis.

Academic expectation: 2.1 – 2.6 (Scientific Method, Patterns, Systems, Scales and Models, Constancy and Change over Time)

Core Content Addressed:

1.   Develop and understanding of the seven characteristics of living things

2.   Differentiate between prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells and describe their structure and function of the cell.

3.  Develop and understanding of hereditary characteristics

4.   Become familiar with taxonomy within the modern system of classification

5.   State distinguishing characteristics between the classes of animals

6.   Describe the origin, phylogeny, development and morphology of living organisms

7.   Define various organisms roles within an ecosystem and how they interact in energy flow

8.   Become familiar with biotic relationships and populations

9.   Describe the various behavioral responses to sexual reproduction, predator/prey relationships, interdependent relationships

 

206  AP CHEMISTRY   1 CREDIT

Prerequisites  Chemistry and Algebra II.        Required Co-requisite 223 CHEMISTRY LAB

Course Description: AP Chemistry is an Advanced Placement course and is the equivalent to a general Chemistry course usually taken in the first year of college. It is designed to comply with The College Board’s recommendations to prepare students for an AP Exam in Chemistry. The course helps build students' understanding of the nature and reactivity of matter. The course begins with the structure of atoms, molecules and ions; then students explore how that structure lets us predict and quantify the chemical reactions that substances undergo.

AP Chemistry will enable the student to develop an understanding of chemical concepts and become skilled at solving quantitative chemical problems through a combination of instructional activities. This course will be valuable to all students planning to continue in science, health sciences or engineering courses in college.

This class is meant to be taken along with AP Chemistry lab.  If you take this course, you should also be signed up for AP Chemistry lab as well.  Because these classes go together, if you wish to drop this class or AP Chemistry Lab, you must do it within the first 2 weeks of the Fall semester.  You may not drop either class after the two week grace period.

I. Structure of Matter

A.                 Atomic theory and atomic structure

1.                 Evidence for the atomic theory

2.                 Atomic masses; determination by chemical and physical means

3.                 Atomic number and mass number; isotopes

4.                 Electron energy levels: atomic spectra, quantum numbers, atomic orbitals

5.                 Periodic relationships including, for example, atomic radii, ionization energies, electron affinities, oxidation states

 

B.                 Chemical bonding

1.                 Binding forces

a.                 Types: ionic, covalent, metallic, hydrogen bonding, van der Waals (including London dispersion forces)

b.                 Relationships to states, structure, and properties of matter

c.                 Polarity of bonds, electronegativities

2.                 Molecular models

a.                 Lewis structures

b.                 Valence bond: hybridization of orbitals, resonance, sigma and pi bonds

c.                 VSEPR

3.                 Geometry of molecules and ions, structural isomerism of simple organic molecules and coordination complexes; dipole moments of         

molecules; relation of properties to structure

C.                Nuclear chemistry: nuclear equations, half-lives, and radioactivity; chemical applications

II. States of Matter

A.                 Gases

1.                 Laws of ideal gases

a.                 Equation of state for an ideal gas

b.                 Partial pressures

2.                 Kinetic molecular theory

a.                 Interpretation of ideal gas laws on the basis of this theory

b.                 Avogadro’s hypothesis and the mole concept

c.                 Dependence of kinetic energy of molecules on temperature

d.                 Deviations from ideal gas laws

B.                 Liquids and solids

1.                 Liquids and solids from the kinetic-molecular viewpoint

2.                 Phase diagrams of one-component systems

3.                 Changes of state, including critical points and triple points

4.                 Structure of solids; lattice energies

C.                Solutions

1.                 Types of solutions and factors affecting solubility

2.                 Methods of expressing concentration (use of normalities is not tested)

3.                 Raoult’s law and colligative properties (nonvolatile solutes); osmosis

4.                 Nonideal behavior (qualitative aspects)

III. Reactions

A.                 Reaction types

1.                 Acid-base reactions; concepts of Arrhenius, Brønsted-Lowry and Lewis; coordination complexes; amphoterism

2.                 Precipitation reactions

3.                 Oxidation-reduction reactions

a.                 Oxidation number

b.                 The role of the electron in oxidation-reduction

c.                 Electrochemistry: electrolytic and galvanic cells; Faraday’s laws; standardhalf-cell potentials; Nernst equation; prediction of the direction of redox reactions

B.                 Stoichiometry

1.                 Ionic and molecular species present in chemical systems: net ionic equations

2.                 Balancing of equations, including those for redox reactions

3.                 Mass and volume relations with emphasis on the mole concept, including empirical formulas and limiting reactants

C.                Equilibrium

1.                 Concept of dynamic equilibrium, physical and chemical; Le Chatelier’s principle;  equilibrium constants

2.                 Quantitative treatment

a.                 Equilibrium constants for gaseous reactions: Kp, Kc

b.                 Equilibrium constants for reactions in solution

                    (1) Constants for acids and bases; pK; pH

                    (2) Solubility product constants and their application to precipitation and the dissolution of slightly soluble compounds

                    (3) Common ion effect; buffers; hydrolysis

D.                Kinetics

1.                 Concept of rate of reaction

2.                 Use of experimental data and graphical analysis to determine reactant order, rate constants and reaction rate laws

3.                 Effect of temperature change on rates

4.                 Energy of activation; the role of catalysts

5.                 The relationship between the rate-determining step and a mechanism

E.                 Thermodynamics

1.                 State functions

2.                 First law: change in enthalpy; heat of formation; heat of reaction; Hess’s law; heats of vaporization and fusion; calorimetry

3.                 Second law: entropy; free energy of formation; free energy of reaction; dependence of change in free energy on enthalpy and entropy changes

4.                 Relationship of change in free energy to equilibrium constants and electrode  potentials

 

 

223  AP CHEMISTRY LABORATORY   1 CREDIT

Prerequisite: Chemistry or Honors Chemistry – Must be taken in conjunction with AP Chemistry class

The purpose of this class is to give secondary students the opportunity to experience correct laboratory techniques and experiences.  The AP Chemistry exam includes various questions that test the students ability to apply the key concepts that would be seen in a college chemistry course.  The laboratory exercises used in this course will complement the concepts being taught in the AP Chemistry course.

This class is meant to be taken along with AP Chemistry class.  If you take this course, you should also be signed up for AP Chemistry as well.  Because these classes go together, if you wish to drop this class or AP Chemistry class, you must do it within the first 2 weeks of the Fall semester.  You may not drop either class after the two week grace period.

  There are standard labs which are required for the students to perform to assure comprehension of specific course content.

• making observations of chemical reactions and substances

• recording data

• calculating and interpreting results based on the quantitative data obtained

• communicating effectively the results of experimental work

 

1.                 Percentage composition

2.                 Empirical and molecular formulas from experimental data

3.                 Molar masses from gas density, freezing-point and boiling-point measurements

4.                 Gas laws, including the ideal gas law, Dalton’s law and Graham’s law

5.                 Stoichiometric relations using the concept of the mole; titration calculations

6.                 Mole fractions; molar and molar solutions

7.                 Faraday’s laws of electrolysis

8.                 Equilibrium constants and their applications, including their use for simultaneous equilibria

9.                 Standard electrode potentials and their use; Nernst equation

10.               Thermodynamic and thermochemical calculations

11.               Kinetics calculations

 

 

218   WKU CHEMISTRY 105/106       1/2 CREDIT    DUAL CREDIT

Prerequisite:  High School Chemistry

     The first semester of a two-semester sequential course designed for liberal arts and pre-health science students.  The course covers the fundamental principles and concepts of chemistry including structure, bonding, acid-base chemistry, oxidation-reduction, elementary thermodynamics and kinetics and equilibrium chemistry.  This course can be taken for college credit or a science elective.  Tuition at WKU is required if you plan to take this for college credit.  Lecture – 3 college credit hours.  Laboratory – 1 college credit hour.

 

219  WKU CHEMISTRY 107/108     1/2  CREDIT     DUAL CREDIT

Prerequisite:  Chemistry 105/106

The second semester introduces the families and reactions of carbon (organic) chemistry.  The major emphasis is on nomenclature and structure of organic compounds, the macromolecular structures of biochemistry including carbohydrates, lipids and proteins.  This course can only be taken if you have passed Chemistry 105-106.  This course can be taken for college credit or a science elective.  Tuition at WKU is required if you plan to take this course for college credit.  Lecture – 3 college credit hours.  Laboratory – 3 college credit hours.

 

208   AP BIOLOGY      1  CREDIT

  Prerequisites:  Biology and Chemistry and approval of the Instructor or the Department chair

Grade Level:  10-12          Required Co-requisite 213 AP Biology Lab

AP Biology is an elective course suggested for students who are academically proficient and highly motivated in the life sciences.  It is designed to give students a survey course equivalent to that which they will experience in their college freshman Biology class, including laboratories, and mastery of its content.  Students will be expected to take the National AP Biology exam upon completion of the course (a fee is required for examination).  Any student who passes the exam will be awarded collegiate credit hours by most colleges & Universities.  Admission to this class is based on past performance in science classes, ACT explore & Plan Science benchmarks.

Academic Expectations:  2.1 - 2.6 (Scientific Method, Patterns, Systems, Scale and Models, Constancy and change over time)

Core Content Addressed

  1.  Describe carbon and the functional groups

  2.  Describe inorganic and organic compounds

  3.  Differentiate between prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells

  4.  Differentiate between plant and animal cell and their cellular components

  5.  Examine structure and function of cell membranes

  6.  Examine structure and function of subcellular components of motility and cytoskeleton

  7.  Examine cell mitosis and cytokinesis

  8.  Relate ATP, energy transfer and coupled reactions

  9.  Describe C3 and C4 photosynthesis

10.  Describe glycosis, fermentation and aerobic respiration

11.  Describe DNA structure and replication

12.  Explain mutation

13.  Work with recombinant DNA and DNA cloning

14.  Understand meiosis and its outcomes

15.  Explain Mendel’s law of probability

16.  Relate inheritance patterns:  chromosomes, genes and alleles

17.  Describe human genetic defects

18.  Explain origin of life

19.  Explain natural selection

20.  Explain human genetic defects

21.  Solve problems related to the Hardy-Weinberg principle

22.  Recognize patterns of evolution, gradualism and punctuated equilibrium

23.  Explain principles of taxonomy and systematic and the five kingdom system

24.  Understand structure and physiology of vascular plants

25.  Review pH and water

26.  Explain chemical reactions, free energy changes and equilibrium

27.  RNA and protein synthesis

28.  Describe regulations of gene expression

29.  Understand hybridization and DNA sequencing

30.  Compare DNA and RNA viruses

31.  State factors influencing allelic frequencies

32.  Explain speculation isolating mechanisms, allopathy, sympatry, and adaptive radiation

33.  Explain plant diversity, classification, and phylogeny

34.  Describe seed formation, germination and growth in seed plant

35.  Demonstrate hormonal regulation of plant growth

36.  Study structure and function of the organs of the circulatory, skeletal, muscular, respiratory, digestive, excretory, reproductive,            

       endocrine, nervous systems of the body

37.  Discussion of the vertebrates and invertebrates

 

213  AP BIOLOGY LAB    1 Credit

Prerequisites: Biology – Must be in conjunction with AP Biology class

Descriptive and experimental laboratory exercises will be assigned that will provide the maximum opportunity for students to learn a variety of skills and those facts, principles, and concepts of general biology covered in lectures, reading, and discussion. In addition, good laboratory exercises can present novel material not covered in other parts of the course. Laboratory work will encourage the development of important skills such

as detailed observation, accurate recording, experimental design, manual manipulation, data interpretation, statistical analysis, and operation of technical equipment.  Laboratory assignments offer the opportunity for students to learn about problem solving, the scientific method, the techniques of research, and the use of scientific literature. Laboratory investigations also encourage higher-order thinking, which may include evaluating and monitoring progress through an investigation, generating ideas, and formulating hypotheses.  This class is meant to be taken along with AP Biology class.  If you take this course, you should also be signed up for AP Biology as well.  Because these classes go together, if you wish to drop this class or AP Biology, you must do it within the first 2 weeks of the Fall semester.  You may not drop either class after the two week grace period.

                                                                                                                                                                                      

Laboratory Topic

1.                 Diffusion and Osmosis

2.                 Enzyme Catalysis

3.                 Mitosis and Meiosis

4.                 Plant Pigments and Photosynthesis

5.                 Cell Respiration

6.                 Molecular Biology

7.                 Genetics of Organisms

8.                 Population Genetics and Evolution

9.                 Transpiration

10.               Physiology of the Circulatory System

11.               Animal Behavior

12.               Dissolved Oxygen and Aquatic Primary Productivity

 

 

210 FORENSIC SCIENCE  1/2 CREDIT

Prerequisite:  Junior or senior elective only.  Students must have successfully completed ICP or Chemistry I.

Course Description:  Forensic science will familiarize students with basic principles and uses of forensics in crime scene investigations.  Students will be introduced to crime scene analysis techniques including forensic anthropology, ballistics, botany, entomology, physical and trace evidence, and serology.  This course will introduce basic applications of biological, chemical, physical, medical, and behavioral sciences along with questions of evidence and law.  This course allows and exciting way to teach academic science standards including the following:

  • Identify and refine questions and identify scientific concepts to guide the design of scientific investigations.
  • Design and conduct different kinds of scientific investigations for a wide variety of reasons.
  • Use equipment (e.g., microscopes, lasers), tools (e.g., beakers), techniques (e.g., microscope skills), technology (e.g., computers), and mathematics to improve scientific investigations and communications.
  • Use evidence, logic, and scientific knowledge to develop and revise scientific explanations and models.
  • Communicate designs, procedures, and results of scientific investigations.
  • Review and analyze scientific investigations and explanations of others.
  • Analyze the role science plays in everyday life compare different careers in science.
  • Recognize that scientific knowledge comes from empirical standards, logical arguments, skepticism, and is subject to change as new evidence becomes available.
  • Investigate advances in science and technology that have important and long-lasting effects on science and society  (e.g., newtonian mechanics, plate tectonics, germ theory, medical and health technology).

 

 

212  CHEMISTRY IN THE COMMUNITY  1 CREDIT

Prerequisite: Biology, ICP or Integrated Science

Grade: 10-12

Students will:

  • Identify and refine questions and identify scientific concepts to guide the design of scientific investigations.
  • Design and conduct different kinds of scientific investigations for a wide variety of reasons.
  • Use equipment (e.g., microscopes, lasers), tools (e.g., beakers), techniques (e.g., computers), mathematics to improve scientific investigations and communications.
  • Use evidence, logic, and scientific knowledge to develop and revise scientific explanations and models.
  • Communicate designs, procedures, and results of scientific investigations.
  • Review and analyze scientific investigations and explanations of others.
  • Analyze atomic structure and electric forces.
  • Examine nuclear structure, nuclear forces, and nuclear reactions (e.g., fission, fusion, radioactivity).
  • Investigate how the structure of matter (e.g., outer electrons, type of bond) relates to chemical properties of matter.
  • Investigate how the structure of matter (e.g., constituent atoms, distances and angles between atoms) relates to physical properties of matter.
  • Investigate chemical reactions and the release or consumption of energy.
  • Examine the transfer of electrons or hydrogen ions between reacting ions, molecules, or atoms.
  • Investigate factors (e.g., temperature, catalysts) affecting reaction rates.
  • Investigate forces and the effects of forces on the motion of objects.
  • Investigate gravitational and electromagnetic forces.
  • Examine how energy is transferred (e.g., collisions, light waves) and recognize that the total energy of the universe is constant.
  • Distinguish between types of energy (e.g., kinetic energy, potential energy, energy fields).
  • Examine how everything tends to become less organized and less orderly over time (e.g., heat moves from hotter to cooler objects).
  • Investigate energy transfer caused when waves and matter interact (e.g., atoms and molecules can absorb and emit light waves).
  • Recognize that the Earth contains a fixed amount of each stable chemical atom or element.
  • Apply scientific inquiry and conceptual understandings to solving problems of technological  design (e.g., Styrofoam cups, transistors, computer chips).
  • Examine the interaction between science and technology.
  • Explore the impact of scientific knowledge and discoveries on personal and community health.
  • Recognize how science influences human population growth.
  • Use science to investigate natural hazards and human-induced hazards.
  • Analyze how science and technology are necessary but not sufficient for solving local, national, and global issues.
  • Analyze the role science plays in everyday life and compare different careers in science.
  • Recognize that scientific knowledge comes from empirical standards, logical arguments, skepticism, and is subject to change as new evidence becomes available.
  • Investigate advances in science and technology that have important and long-lasting effects on science and society (e.g., Newtonian mechanics, plate tectonics, germ theory, medical and health technology). 

 

214  HONORS CHEMISTRY   1 CREDIT

Grade Level: 10 – 11 (Admission to this class will be based on teacher recommendation, past performance in math and science classes and ACT Explore and/or ACT Plan scores in Science.

This course is designed to cover all the objectives and core content material as Chemistry I.  Students will be expected to move through the material faster, have great work ethic, and be highly motivated to excel.  The material in this class will be more involved than in the Chemistry I course.

Student Expectation and Experience

  1.  Work with significant digits and SI units to solve mathematical problems

  2.  Classify matter in terms of atoms, molecules, compounds, mixtures, and solution

  3.  Use lab skills to determine and confirm scientific answers

  4.  Complete and balance a variety of equations given only the reactants

  5.  Describe the atomic theory and the various models of the atom from a historical context

  6.  Utilize the periodic table of elements to predict properties and characteristics of elements

  7.  Determine percent composition of a compound

  8.  Solve for the empirical formula of a compound

  9.  Use stoichiometry to determine the masses required for reactions to occur or the masses produced by given amounts of reactant

10.  Comprehend the standard gas laws and use the properly to solve problems

11.  Work with solution concentration of an unknown base using titration

12.  Use oxidation numbers

13.  Utilize proper nomenclature in all aspects of inorganic and elementary organic chemistry

14.  Describe the basic processes involved in nuclear chemistry

15.  Analyze how chemistry affects daily life and be aware of its importance in terms of environmental problems and solutions

16.  Analyze the conversion of potential energy to kinetic energy

 

 

215  HONORS INTEGRATED SCIENCE 1 CREDIT   

Grade Level: 9   Admission to this class will be based on teacher recommendation, past performance in math and science classes and ACT Explore and MAPS scores in Science.

This course is designed to cover all the objectives and core content material as Integrated Science.  Students will be expected to move through the material faster, have great work ethic, and be highly motivated to excel.  The material in this class will be more involved than in the Integrated course.

Student will:

  • Identify and refine questions and identify scientific concepts to guide the design of scientific investigations.
  • Design and conduct different kinds of scientific investigations for a wide variety of reasons.
  • Use equipment (e.g., microscopes, lasers), tools (e.g., beakers), techniques (e.g., microscope skills), technology (e.g., computers), and mathematics to improve scientific investigations and communications.
  • Use evidence, logic, and scientific knowledge to develop and revise scientific explanations and models.
  • Communicate designs, procedures, and results of scientific investigations.
  • Review and analyze scientific investigations and explanations of others.
  • Investigate forces and  the effects of forces on the motion of objects.
  • Investigate gravitational and electromagnetic forces.
  • Examine how energy is transferred (e.g., collisions, light waves) and recognize that the total energy of the universe is constant.
  • Distinguish between types of energy (e.g., kinetic energy potential energy, energy fields).
  • Examine how everything tends to become less organized and less orderly over time (e.g., heat moves from hotter to cooler objects).
  • Investigate energy transfer caused when waves and matter interact (e.g., atoms and molecules can absorb and emit light waves).
  • Investigate electrical energy and conductivity through matter.
  • Examine internal and external sources of energy.
  • Examine how internal sources of energy propel crustal plates across the face of the globe.
  • Describe the formation of the solar system.
  • Investigate how to estimate geologic time (e.g., observing rock sequences, radioactive dating).
  • Examine and interpret ongoing change of the Earth system (e.g., earthquakes, mountain building).
  • Describe theories of the formation of the universe (e.g., big bang theory).
  • Describe the formation of the stars.
  • Examine stars (e.g., energy production, formation of elements).
  • Apply scientific inquiry and conceptual understandings to solving problems of technological design (e.g., Styrofoam cups, transistors, computer chips).
  • Examine the interaction between science and technology.
  • Explore the impact of scientific knowledge and discoveries on personal and community health.
  • Recognize how science influences human population growth.
  • Use science to analyze the use of natural resources by an increasing human population.
  • Analyze how science and technology are necessary but not sufficient for solving local, national, and global issues.
  • Analyze the role science plays in everyday life compare different careers in science.
  • Recognize that scientific knowledge comes from empirical standards, logical arguments, skepticism, and is subject to change as new evidence becomes available.
  • Investigate advances in science and technology that have important and long-lasting effects on science and society  (e.g., newtonian mechanics, plate tectonics, germ theory, medical and health technology).
  • Examine internal and external sources of energy
  • Examine how internal sources of energy propel crystal plates across the globe
  • Examine how external sources of energy produce winds and ocean currents
  • Examine how external sources of energy determine globe climate
  • Recognize that the Earth contains a fixed amount of each stable chemical atom or element
  • Analyze Earth’s chemical reservoirs and recognize that each element can exist in several reservoirs
  • Investigate how Earth’s internal and external sources of energy drive geochemical cycles
  • Describe the formation of the solar system
  • Investigate how to estimate geologic time
  • Examine and interpret ongoing changes of the Earth system
  • Describe theories of the formation of the universe
  • Describe the formation of the stars
  • Examine stars for energy production and formation of element

 

Integrated vs. Honors Integrated

         Teacher Recommendation

         Classroom  Preformance

         Above Benchmark MAPS scores

 

 

*** AS A FRESHMAN, A STUDENT MUST MEET BENCHMARKS IN MATH AND READING ON MAP AND MAKE 19 OR ABOVE ON ACT EXPLORE IN SCIENCE TO BE PLACED IN HONORS BIOLOGY.        

217   HONORS BIOLOGY 1 CREDIT

Grade Level:  9 – 10    Admission to this class will be based on teacher recommendation, past performance in math and science classes and ACT Explore/MAPS scores in science.

This course is designed to cover all the objectives and core content material as Biology I but at an accelerated rate.  Students will be expected to move through the material faster, have great work ethic, and be highly motivated to excel.  The material in this class will be more involved than Biology I.

Core Content Addressed:

  1. State, define and use the steps of the scientific method.
  2. Develop an understanding of the seven characteristics of living things
  3. Introduce the concept of inorganic and organic compounds in living things
  4. Differentiate between prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells and describe the structure and function of a cell
  5. Define, compare and contrast the functions of photosynthesis and cellular respiration
  6. Explain DNA structure and replication as well as protein synthesis
  7. Describe the steps of mitosis and the significance and outcomes of each event
  8. Introduces genetic principles including using the punnent square and applying these principles to living things
  9. Introduce the mechanisms of gene expression in both normal and abnormal development
  10. Develop an understanding of hereditary characteristics
  11. Become familiar with taxonomy within the five kingdom system of classification
  12. State distinguishing characteristics between the Monera, Protista, Fungi, Plantae and Animal Kingdoms
  13. Differentiate viruses from cellular organisms
  14. Differentiate vertebrate from invertebrate organisms
  15. Comparison study of the different phylum within the Animal kingdom
  16. Describe the orgin, phylogeny, development and morphology of living organisms
  17. Define the ecological units of the biosphere
  18. Describe the various roles of individual organisms and energy flow through ecosystems
  19. Differentiate biotic from abiotic
  20. Become familiar with biotic relationships and populations

 

 

220 INTEGRATED SCIENCE   1 CREDIT

Grade Level: 9

This course is designed to be an introductory course in the areas of physics and chemistry.

Students will:

  • Identify and refine questions and identify scientific concepts to guide the design of scientific investigations.
  • Design and conduct different kinds of scientific investigations for a wide variety of reasons.
  • Use equipment (e.g., microscopes, lasers), tools (e.g., beakers), techniques (e.g., computers), mathematics to improve scientific investigations and communications.
  • Use evidence, logic, and scientific knowledge to develop and revise scientific explanations and models.
  • Communicate designs, procedures, and results of scientific investigations.
  • Review and analyze scientific investigations and explanations of others.
  • Analyze atomic structure and electric forces.
  • Examine nuclear structure, nuclear forces, and nuclear reactions (e.g., fission, fusion, radioactivity).
  • Investigate how the structure of matter (e.g., outer electrons, type of bond) relates to chemical properties of matter.
  • Investigate how the structure of matter (e.g., constituent atoms, distances and angles between atoms) relates to physical properties of matter.
  • Investigate chemical reactions and the release or consumption of energy.
  • Examine the transfer of electrons or hydrogen ions between reacting ions, molecules, or atoms.
  • Investigate factors (e.g., temperature, catalysts) affecting reaction rates.
  • Examine how energy is transferred (e.g., collisions, light waves) and recognize that the total energy of the universe is constant.
  • Examine how everything tends to become less organized and less orderly over time (e.g., heat moves from hotter to cooler objects).
  • Investigate energy transfer caused when waves and matter interact (e.g., atoms and molecules can absorb and emit light waves).
  • Recognize that the Earth contains a fixed amount of each stable chemical atom or element.
  • Analyze the role science plays in everyday life and compare different careers in science.
  • Investigate advances in science and technology that have important and long-lasting effects on science and society (e.g., Newtonian mechanics, plate tectonics, germ theory, medical and health technology).
  • Investigate forces and  the effects of forces on the motion of objects.
  • Investigate gravitational and electromagnetic forces.
  • Examine how energy is transferred (e.g., collisions, light waves) and recognize that the total energy of the universe is constant.
  • Distinguish between types of energy (e.g., kinetic energy potential energy, energy fields).
  • Examine how everything tends to become less organized and less orderly over time (e.g., heat moves from hotter to cooler objects).
  • Investigate energy transfer caused when waves and matter interact (e.g., atoms and molecules can absorb and emit light waves).
  • Investigate electrical energy and conductivity through matter.
  • Examine internal and external sources of energy.