Family & Consumer Science Department

FAMILY & CONSUMER

SCIENCE

DEPARTMENT

 

381- Principles of Teaching (1 Credit)

Grade Level:  10-12

Course Description: 

This course provides opportunities for students with an interest in teaching to develop skills, strategies, and techniques used for instruction at various grade levels.  Instruction addresses the principles and procedures for promoting the physical, emotional, social, and intellectual development of children, adolescents and developmentally appropriate practices in educational settings.  Students will gain work experience in classrooms with certified teachers as part of their course work.  Other components include the development of a four-year post-secondary plan, salaries and benefits of a teacher, job security, and future projections of the job market.  Leadership experiences will be provided through student organizations (e.g., co-curricular, extra-curricular).

 

  • compile the characteristics of an effective teacher.
  • identify the qualities of teacher professionalism and leadership.
  • describe the requirements to become a teacher.
  • identify career opportunities for educators.
  • trace through time the history of American education.
  • describe how education systems are organized.
  • explore diversity and its implications in the classroom, including diverse teaching methods.
  • define curriculum and identify the forces that influence its development.
  • analyze different methods used to assess student learning.
  • identify issues and challenges in education today such as No Child Left Behind, changing family patterns, cultures of schools, etc.
  • develop a lesson plan using strategies/methods taught in class.
  • teach a lesson using the lesson plan developed by the student.
  • observe, interact and reflect on teaching and learning in classrooms.
  • develop a four-year post-secondary plan.
  • utilize activities of the Family, Career and Community Leaders of America or other student organizations as an integral component of course content and leadership development.
  • apply reading and communication skills within technical content.
  • demonstrate employability and social skills relevant to the career cluster.

 

427 Parenting (1/2 Credit)

Grade Level:  10-12

Course Description:  This course is designed to aid students in developing parenting and care giving skills that can be applied in a variety of situations. Major topics include becoming an informed parent, caring for the newborn, being an effective parent/caregiver, caring for the sick and elderly and exploring career opportunities in care giving. Leadership development will be provided through the Family, Career and Community Leaders of America.

  • distinguish among family structures.
  • contrast common examples of family crises
  • predict how work and family roles are balanced based on values and goals.
  • distinguish between traditional and reciprocal roles employed by families.
  • examine factors to be considered in assessing readiness for parenthood.
  • identify causes of and solutions for infertility.
  • recognize that many hereditary or chromosomal effects can be predicted and prevented by genetic counseling.
  • identify the parts and functions of the male and female reproductive system.
  • describe methods of birth control.
  • identify the early signs of  pregnancy and the tests for confirming pregnancy.
  • identify the aspects of adequate prenatal care.
  • compare fetal development during each trimester of pregnancy.
  • analyze factors that contribute to reducing birth defects.
  • recognize the importance of advanced preparation for arrival of a baby.
  • describe the birth process.
  • describe the physical characteristics of the newborn.
  • recognize the various aspects of routine infant care including safety.
  • recognize stages of infant development.
  • analyze responsibilities common to parenting and care giving roles.
  • recognize signs of illness in a child.
  • determine appropriate treatment of children’s accidents or injuries.
  • dramatize an effective family council meeting.
  • interpret the Family and Medical Leave Act.
  • examine the support systems available for care of the elderly.
  • investigate the specific jobs or careers in the fields of child care/elder care.
  • create written and oral reports of chosen issue affecting families.
  • utilize activities of the Family, Career and Community Leaders of America student organization as an integral component of course content and leadership development.
  • apply math, science and communication skills within technical content.

demonstrate employability and social skills relevant to the career cluster.

 

472Relationships   (1/2 Credit)

Grade Level : 10-12

Course Description:  This course assists students to develop self-understanding, understand others better, improve interpersonal skills both within and outside the family, be more considerate of other person’s needs and property, and maintain mental and emotional wellness.  Family Life education comprises a portion of this course, including dating and married relationships.  Preparations for and the achievement of a successful marriage are emphasized. Leadership development will be provided through the Family, Career and Community Leaders of America.

  • relate self concept to the fulfillment of one’s personal needs.
  • propose ways to fulfill basic human needs.
  • illustrate gender roles that promote positive self image.
  • identify ways of developing positive character traits.
  • examine the effects of culture, stereotyping and prejudices on relationships.
  • evaluate the significance of family and its impact on the well being of individuals and society.
  • contrast characteristics of functional and dysfunctional families.
  • assess the impact of types of abuse and determine methods of prevention.
  • recommend ways of resolving conflicts.
  • identify the characteristics of good mental health.
  • recommend ways to improve intergenerational relationships.
  • explain the need to respect property rights of others.
  • demonstrate etiquette skills used as an individual, family member and wage earner.
  • predict how work and family roles are balanced based on values and goals.
  • examine the impact of role models on one’s life.
  • practice using refusal skills to resist peer pressure.
  • examine one’s relationship with friends.
  • compare the characteristics of an ideal date to those of an ideal mate.
  • compare the similarities and differences of infatuation, sexual gratification and mature love.
  • explain how premarital sexual intimacy could adversely affect one’s entire life.
  • describe prevention, treatment and the physical effect of sexually transmitted diseases.
  • predict problems unique to single working parents.
  • analyze the traits of a long term, successful marriage.
  • distinguish between real and ideal expectations in marriage.
  • analyze career opportunities concerned with relationships of individual and families.
  • utilize activities of the Family, Career and Community Leaders of America student organization as an integral component of course content and leadership development.
  • apply math, science and communication skills within technical content.

 

424- Child and Human Development (1 Credit)

Grade Level:  10-12       ONLY 

Course Description: 

This course addresses the practical problems related to understanding the types and stages of human growth and development, recognizing effects of heredity and environment on human growth and development, meeting the needs of exceptional children, promoting optimum growth and development in the infancy, toddler, and preschool.  Careers in child/human development are explored.  Leadership development will be provided through the Family, Career and Community Leaders of America.

  • Explain the types of human growth and development.
  • Recognize the effects of heredity and environment on human growth and development
  • Describe the stages of human growth and development
  • Identify factors that promote optimum growth and development in the infancy and toddler stages, including physical growth, social and emotional development and intellectual development
  • Identify factors that promote optimum growth and development in pre-school stage including social, emotional and intellectual growth
  • Organize play activities for the pre-school child.
  • Analyze conditions that influence human growth and development.
  • Describe methods of identifying exceptional children.
  • Identify health and safety issues.
  • Compile information about careers in child/human development.
  • Utilize activities of the Family Career Community Leaders of America student organization as an integral component of course content and leadership development.
  • Apply math, science, and communication skills with technical content.
  • Demonstrate employability and social skills relevant to the career cluster.

 

426 – Foods and Nutrition (1 Credit)

Grade Level: 10-12

Course Description: This course is designed to assist students in making critical decisions about food, which contributes to health and well-being. Laboratory instruction is included as an application process.  Practical problems addressed relate to attitudes toward food, nutrition facts, special health concerns and diets, management of food resources, preparation skills, food safety, sanitation and careers in nutrition and food service.  Leadership development will be provided through the Family, Career and Community Leaders of America.

  • Determine how changes in technology have increased food choices.
  • Identify physical, social, cultural and economic influences and trends related to food choices.
  • Explain how digestion turns food into usable nutrients (digestion, absorption, metabolism).
  • Propose a balanced meal plan using the Dietary Guidelines for Healthy Living/My Pyramid.Gov.
  • Examine how personal food choice affects nutrition, personal wellness and maintaining a healthy weight.
  • Research various eating disorders and identify sources of help.
  • Demonstrate and/or practice basic cooking methods to prepare a variety of foods.
  • Identify and use basic kitchen equipment and tools.
  • Managing a safe, effective and productive lab while utilizing teamwork.
  • Practice measuring techniques for liquid and dry ingredients.
  • Change yield of recipe.
  • Inspect food labels for nutrition and food additives.
  • Recognize the value of following a shopping plan for food.
  • Calculate the difference in cost and identify variances in nutrition among semi-prepared, fully prepared convenience meals, fast food or other quick service meals, and home prepared foods.
  • Calculate unit price, using comparison shopping methods, compare labels to create a meal plan based on cost and personal nutrition needs.
  • Examine and select convenience foods according to time saved, the cost and the quality.
  • Identify and practice various types of food presentation techniques.
  • Practice dining etiquette and table set up when eating at a restaurant or in the home.
  • Demonstrate waste disposal and recycling methods.
  • Demonstrate proper safety, sanitation, storage and preparation techniques in handling food from purchase, preparation, cooking, cooling, to reheating.
  • Categorize careers in nutrition/food service according to skill required and type of job.
  • Assess employment opportunities and preparation requirements.
  • Demonstrate employability and social skills relevant to the career cluster.
  • Demonstrate safe, sanitary work habits required by the field.
  • Demonstrate written, verbal and non-verbal communication skills.
  • Demonstrate and practice knowledge of food service safety and sanitation procedures and the factors that contribute to food borne illnesses.
  • Apply time management skills.
  • Apply math, science and communication skills within technical content.
  • Demonstrate employability and social skills relevant to the career cluster.
  • Utilize activities of the Family, Career and Community Leaders of America student organization as an integral component of course content and leadership development.

 

420 Life Skills  (1Credit)

Grade Level:  9-10 (only)

Course Description:  This comprehensive course provides an opportunity for acquiring basic life skills and allows students to select specific areas for concentrated study.  Emphasis is on work and family, adolescent development, selection and care of clothing, consumer spending, housing choices, challenges of child rearing, and guidance in establishing relationships.  Leadership development will be provided through the Family, Career and Community Leaders of America.

 

  • Analyze the practical problems faced by families to balance the demands of work and family.
  • Predict the results of accomplishing or failing to accomplish the developmental tasks of adolescence.
  • Identify some positive and negative influences of peers on adolescent behavior.
  • Summarize ways of reducing or preventing teen pregnancy.
  • Practice coordinating clothing and accessories.
  • Use the decision making process.
  • Plan a personal budget.
  • Calculate sales tax, price per unit, and sale discounts.
  • Analyze the results of good/poor study habits.
  • Develop personal short-term and long-term goals.
  • Identify physical, psychological, social and health influences on personal wellness and practice social skills (e.g., dining etiquette).
  • Analyze the causes and consequences of diet, exercise, rest and other substance choices on various body systems.
  • Evaluate a meal for essential nutrients.
  • Plan menus for a day using Dietary Guidelines for Healthy Living.
  • Prepare a simple meal and practice dining etiquette.
  • Analyze careers in Family and Consumer Sciences.
  • Analyze financial, social, physical and emotional costs of parenthood.
  • Evaluate the consequences of high risk behaviors.
  • Develop a plan to improve social skills.
  • Identify appropriate apparel maintenance.
  • Compare consumer products.
  • Utilize activities of the Family, Career and Community Leaders of America student organization as an integral component of course content and leadership development.
  • Apply math, science and communication skills within technical content.
  • Demonstrate employability and social skills relevant to the career cluster.

 

421- Money Skills for Math (1Credit) (Interdisciplinary course for Mathematics – 4th required credit)

Grade Level:  10-12     

Course Description: 

This course is designed to provide students with math concepts needed in developing sound money management skills which will help to improve the quality of life for individuals and their families.  Components of math, decision making and problem solving skills, goal setting and technology will be integral components of the course.  A correlation to the math content in the program of studies was used in developing this course to count as a fourth math credit.  Leadership development will be coordinated through Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) student organization. 

  • understand how personal financial decisions are influenced by a person’s interpretation of needs and wants and values.
  • analyze lifestyle conditions which may affect one’s financial situation throughout the life cycle.
  • recognize the importance of career planning, salaries, and benefits to overall financial well-being.
  • create a spending plan/budget.
  • demonstrate skills in understanding payroll deductions.
  • understand economic systems and the role of government agencies as they relate to sound financial management.
  • understand the levels of financial risk associated with checking accounts, saving and investing.
  • evaluating financial institutions and the services they provide.
  • manage checking accounts, savings accounts, investment accounts.
  • define and use common terminology associated with savings and investing.
  • understand interest, and the time value of money.
  • understand the implications of personal bankruptcy.
  • evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of renting and owning a home.
  • demonstrate the process of renting and/or purchasing a home.
  • demonstrate working knowledge of investments appropriate for individuals and families.
  • demonstrate skills in tax forms preparation.
  • understand the relationship between risk and insurance.
  • select insurance (homeowner’s, renter’s, automobile, health, and life) appropriate for individuals and families.
  • demonstrate skills necessary for leasing and/or purchasing a vehicle.
  • identify the advantages and disadvantages of each of the types of credit.
  • analyze credit card offers and statements.
  • develop the skills necessary to prevent identity theft.
  • demonstrate skills in wise spending practices (advertising, comparison shopping, warranties, defective merchandise).
  • understand the financial tools used to plan for retirement (Social Security, pensions, individual retirement accounts, Roth IRA, company sponsored retirement programs).
  • demonstrate the process of requesting and interpreting a credit report.
  • describe the purpose of a will and other estate planning documents.
  • utilize activities of the Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) student organization as an integral component of course content and leadership development.
  • apply math, science and communication skills within technical content.
  • demonstrate employability and social skills relevant to the career cluster.